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1. February 2019

A quick and comprehensive guide to bond investing

In the last article, we explored the various asset classes available to retail investors in today’s climate. We ended on a note that bonds, especially ones backed by an income-generating asset, strike a good balance between capital security and real return.

Today, we will dive deeper into the bond world and explore what makes bonds so attractive and what types of bonds investors should be aiming for when searching. After all, the US bond market alone larger than the entire global equity market capitalisation combined, therefore it is crucial to pick the appropriate instrument that fits your personal risk profile.

 

What is a bond?

Bond is derived from the English word “to bind”, which creates a binding instrument for one party to pay another. In the modern financial world, a bond represents an obligation for the borrower to pay the lender under terms stipulated on the bond instrument.

To retail investors, their most direct encounter with bonds probably lies with the mortgage on their houses. In this case, banks lend homeowners a fixed amount at an agreed interest rate to purchase the house. In return, homeowners repay a certain percentage of the loan (plus interest) every month for the duration of the mortgage.

 

Why do bonds exist?

The distinct advantage when buying an asset using capital (cash) derived from bond issuance is that the borrower retains 100% ownership (equity) of the asset. Imagine instead of issuing you with a mortgage in the house purchase, banks offered you equity investment. It will mean that part of the house will be legally owned by the bank.

What a messy world it becomes!

By using borrowing, it simply means that as long as the borrowers keep up with the obligations outlined in the bond (usually the monthly payment), ownership of the asset remains 100% with the borrower.

Bond is a type of financial leverage that enables investors to punch above their weight and buy assets that were previously out of their reach. It is fundamental to the health of our economies and that’s why there exists a multi-trillion market for it.

 

Why invest in bonds?

Bonds offer return on capital in the form of interest (coupon) payment at a rate stipulated in the issuing instrument. It is fixed and it rarely changes. This makes it an attractive option for investors who seek regular income streams at predictable intervals. In fact, bonds are often called “fixed income instruments” in the financial world.

Bond return is judged on a concept called yield, which is a glorified way of saying interest rate.

Yield (expressed in %) = Total annualised income / Total capital invested

Logically the higher the yield, the more income is generated and naturally the greater the return on capital.

Bondholders usually would continue receiving coupon payments for the duration of the bond holding period. In the end, however, capital is returned to investors in its entirety, without deduction or addition.

Furthermore, bondholders enjoy liquidation preference over equity owners, which means that in the event of bankruptcy, all assets of the company will be sold (liquidated) and the proceeds will be used to redeem bondholders first. Any residuals can then be reimbursed back to equity holders.

Bondholders can even demand an even greater level of capital protection through collateralisation, in the form of secured bonds. In this instance, there is a designated asset (e.g. a house) that serves as security for the debt. Any default events will see bondholders seizing the asset for liquidation and capital recuperation.

This is the central feature of bond: in exchange for capital security, the capital does not appreciate and all returns are earned in the form of coupon payments.

 

Types of bonds

There are several different approaches to classify bonds. Typically they are broken down by the institution that issues them (issuer).

 

Source: InvestingAnswers

 

How bonds behave on open markets?

Given the size of the bond market and its numerous participants, it is important to understand how bonds behave.

Bond investors really only worry about 2 things:

  • Capital security: am I going to get my money back at the end?
  • Return on capital: am I achieving the best yield?

These 2 factors are intricately linked.

Assuming an investor buys a sovereign bond issued by a reputable government (e.g. US Treasury Bills, UK Gilts or Swiss Government Bonds) with a AAA credit rating at par value (i.e. the nominal face value on the bond instrument), it is extremely unlikely for the issuer to default and as a result, the capital security of these bonds is guaranteed. Consequently, the coupon rate (i.e. yield) on these bonds tend to be lower (sub 2% per annum), in order to reflect the decreased risk level borne by the investors.

However, most investors do not buy bonds at par value (i.e. on issuance), but in secondary markets where these instruments are actively traded every day. Here a third factor comes into play and that is the base rate.

Imagine a 20-year term bond has just been issued at 3% coupon with a par value of $100, whereas the base interest rate at the central bank stands at 1%. That means that investors will receive $2 more per year by investing in the bond versus holding the cash as bank deposits. As these 2 assets are perceived to both offer risk-free return, investors would rather park their capital in the bond than the bank deposit, in order to enjoy the superior return.

As demand for the bond begins to outstrip supply on secondary markets (remember the par value will always remain unchanged at $100), the cost of acquiring the bond begins to increase and it can exceed the par value. This is because investors expect the bond return will outstrip deposit return over the long-run, thus delivering better relative value. As a result, they do not mind paying slightly more upfront. The increase in bond price would push down the yield because the absolute income level generated remains unchanged.

Now imagine that the central bank decided to raise the base rate to 4%. Now suddenly bank deposit would generate $1 extra per year over the bond. This instantly decreases the attractiveness of the bond and would cause capital outflow from the bond into the deposit. This decrease in demand pushes down the bond price, which then causes the yield to increase. This, in turn, restored the price equilibrium.

As a result, in addition to capital security and yield, bond price on the secondary market is also intricately linked with the future expectation of central bank interest rates. The greater the expected difference, the greater the bond price movement.

 

Bond price tends to move in opposite direction to interest rate

Source: Fidelity

 

What happens when bonds default?

In life, the unexpected will happen and it always helps to be prepared. When borrowers (bond issuer) fail to adhere to the terms of the bond (usually paying on time), they default. There have been some high profile default events over the past few years:

 

During a default, bondholders (creditors), given their liquidation preference, have the option to apply for court orders to legally liquidate all assets owned by borrowers and attempt to recoup their capital and accrued interest.

However, this may not always be the optimal route when the current assets of the borrower are less than the amount owed. This is especially the case if the borrower is an actively trading business that is generating consistent cash flow. Under these scenarios, it is in the overwhelming interest of both bondholders and shareholders to see the business continue trading rather than having all of its assets immediately seized and liquidated. This way, bondholders can use its cash flow to redeem the outstanding loan whilst shareholders’ equity value is preserved.

In such instance, a process called debt restructuring may occur where the original terms of the debt are modified into more favourable ones that are mutually acceptable by both bond and shareholders. This maintains shareholders’ control of the business whilst ensuring bondholders continue to receive their coupon and capital payments. Debt structuring can only be used by borrowers with consistent cash flow and ideally valuable assets (e.g. properties, machinery) that may serve as collaterals.

 

Property-backed bonds offer a unique combination

From the information detailed above, it is evident that the key features of an attractive bond are:

  • Higher yield relative to its peers and the central bank rate
  • Collateralisation against valuable and marketable assets
  • Borrowers’ ability to generate regular cash flow

As a result, rental properties offer a natural habour for bond investors.

Rental properties can be bought by a limited company (a special purpose vehicle or SPV), which in turn issue bond instruments to fund the purchase. The SPV then uses rental income from the property to make coupon (or a mix of coupon and capital) payments to its bondholders. Given that bondholders can hold the first charge in the title against the property, it means that in the event of default and the property is sold off, bond investors will be first in line for the payout. This significantly reduces risk exposure.

There are 2 conditions when assessing RE-backed bonds:

  1. Underlying rental yield: this must be higher than the coupon rate of the bond as otherwise, coupon payment will become unsustainable;
  2. Loan-to-value (LTV) ratio: this is a measure of indebtedness similar to the debt-to-equity ratio in companies. A 60% LTV ratio means the total outstanding loan on the property represents 60% of the current property value. Put it another way, given that bondholders hold the first charge, the property value will have to fall by more than 40% from its current level for bondholders to start losing their capital, should a liquidation occur today. As a result, the lower the LTV, the greater the capital security.

 

How does it compare to other bonds?

 

Type Example Grade Yield to maturity Capital fluctuation Default recovery
RE-backed bonds LB bonds Ungraded 5.2% None Backed by properties as collateral
US Municipal California Affordable Housing Agency Bond Ungraded 4.4% -2.5% since the commencement of trading Not backed by any assets but instead the municipality’s taxing power
UK Gilt UK 10-year Gilft Aa2 Stable 1.2% Trading at 25% above par value currently Unlikely as the UK has never defaulted and enjoys the highest credit rating
Swiss Corporate Credit Suisse Group Funding Baa2 (Investment Grade Medium) 0.54% Trading at 1% above par value currently Not secured against company assets but creditors may make claims against them through court if default occurs.

 

As one can see from the table above, RE-backed bonds enjoy a unique combination of:

  • High yield to maturity;
  • No risk of capital fluctuation due to it not being publicly traded;
  • Ease of capital recovery during default rather than having to go through an onerous bankruptcy process;
  • Capital recoverability during default is more certain given that most LTV do not exceed 60%, whereas other bonds do not enjoy such benefit.

 

In conclusion

Bond investing occupies a happy intermediate between capital security and real return on the capital. When secured against income-generating real estate assets, its return profile can significantly exceed the risks entailed, thereby making it an attractive investment choice.

7. January 2019

Low-Risk Investment Options For A 50,000 Portfolio in Switzerland

Overview of top investment options: You’ve done the hard work and built up a sizeable portfolio. Now, where should you invest your hard-earned cash so it keeps working hard for you? Mr. Alexander Hubner, CEO of Le Bijou, one of Switzerland top 5 entrepreneurs in the service sector (according to Swiss Economic Forum), examines the various asset classes in the market today and delineates the most appropriate route for investors with an appetite for stable and safe returns.

 

One of the perpetual problems facing investors today is the ability to find assets with decent risk-adjusted returns without suffering a permanent capital loss. This issue is particularly astute amongst retail investors who are looking for where to invest from 50,000 to 100,000 EUR/CHF with low risk.


Comment: I use “EUR/CHF” as this article targets primarily Swiss and EU-based readers, and Swiss Franc and Euro currencies have been relatively close to each other in value over the past decade. Although this material will also be useful to anyone with the stated above portfolio size.

 

At this range, the amount of investable capital is significant enough to hurt investors in the event of a loss. The capital is likely to be the result of years of saving and frugal living. However, at this level, the cost of seeking professional investment advice can appear exorbitant (up to 3% of the total portfolio level). Investors are essentially stuck.

 

Investing can be difficult

It is worth going back to square one and to consider the purpose of investment: investing is to maximize real return whilst minimizing the chance of permanent capital loss.

 

Real returns mean that the financial gains derived from the asset (in the form of income yield and capital appreciation) must exceed the rate of inflation. This will lead to an enhancement in purchasing power.

 

Permanent capital loss is usually a result of failing to account for the risk of a particular asset, thus leading to the inability to recoup the initial capital outlay within a reasonable timeframe.

 

I have a rather extreme personal example.

 

Three years ago, I invested some spare cash into a startup company which promised to revolutionise the realty agency model. Looking at industry comparables, if it could achieve half of the scale its transatlantic competitor did then it would have delivered a 15x return on my capital.

 

Unfortunately, things didn’t quite work out that way. A few days ago, I received an email from the management informing me that the company had entered into administrations and it’s unlikely that investors would be able to recoup any of its investment.

 

Thankfully I only put in some pocket money so no hard feelings. However, this is a clear illustration of the return-capital loss paradox. Whilst the upside of this asset may be huge, it is underpinned by 2 critical risk factors:

  • Capital risk: the asset in question was equity (shares) in a startup company. In the event of bankruptcy (whose probability is quite high), shareholders are last in line to receive a payout, if any.
  • Liquidity risk: the shares in the company are not publicly traded. As a result, it is incredibly difficult to turn it into cash within a short time without suffering a significant loss of value, because not many people have the skills to value, let alone the risk appetite to purchase.

 

Investors today are confounded with these 2 critical risks. Additionally, not many possess the know-how to accurately gauge the risk-return trade-off. Consequently, this often led to poor investment decisions being made, based on gut instinct and information asymmetry.

 

There’s a wide array of investment choices out there

Suppose you have a 50,000 EUR/CHF cash portfolio, saved over from many years. What are your realistic asset choices for investment?

 

There are 3 broad asset classes available today:

 

  • Cash
  • Bond
  • Equity

 

Risk Reward across Asset Classes

Risk reward ratio across different asset classes

 

Comparison of different asset classes by returns and risks

 

Asset category Asset Capital return (per annum) Income return (per annum) Capital risk Liquidity risk
Cash Instant access savings Nil <1% Nil, up to the deposit insurance coverage level Nil
Cash Termed deposit Nil 1-3% depending on the term and currency Nil, up to the deposit insurance coverage level Medium
Cash Money market fund <1% <1.5% Low Low
Bond Treasury bond <2% 0.5-5% depending on the term Low Low
Bond Municipal bond 3%+ depending on the grade 2-6% depending on the municipality Low to medium depending on the municipality (think about Detroit) Low
Bond Corporate bond 3%+ depending on the grade 2%+ depending on the grade Low to high depending on the individual company Low to medium
Bond Peer-to-peer lending Nil 5%+ High High
Bond Real estate bond Nil 3.5% – 5% Low to medium, depending on the type of the bond and real estate Medium
Equity Dividend stocks 4-6% 1-2% Medium Low
Equity Growth stocks 10%+ Usually less than 1%, if any High Medium

 

As the above chart illustrates, cash and cash-like assets tend to have low return coupled with fewer risks and higher liquidity. On the other end of the spectrum, equities have high growth rate and above-inflation dividend yield. However this is counterbalanced by increased volatility and risk of capital loss.

 

Bonds, however, combine the above-cash return with a much lower risk profile. This makes bonds an ideal middle ground for investors with low risk appetite.

 

The case for bond as an investable asset under the current climate

Bond is derived from the English word “to bind”, which creates a binding instrument for one party to pay another. In the modern financial world, a bond represents an obligation for the borrower to pay the lender under terms stipulated on the bond instrument.

 

Here are some of the key characteristics of modern bonds:

  • They do not represent ownership, but merely for the borrower to pay the lender under a specific set of conditions defined by the bond;
  • They provide a fixed rate of return in the form of coupon payment (i.e. interest) to investors at regular intervals;
  • Capital is redeemed at the end of the term;
  • Bonds can be secured against certain assets (collaterals) but don’t necessarily have to be;
  • In the event of default (borrower failing to observe the conditions of the bond), the lender has the right to seize assets and liquidate them to recoup the capital and interests, before any shareholders.

 

There are 2 ways to earn returns when it comes to bond investing:

  1. Coupon payment: each bond has a set interest rate (called coupon) that is paid out at regular intervals (monthly, quarterly or annually). This is the primary way and that’s why bonds are often called fixed income investment.
  2. Capital price appreciation: bonds represents an obligation between the borrower and the lender. Each bond is sold and redeemed at the face value of the bond (aka par value, usually in 100 EUR/CHF increments). It is possible, under certain situations (e.g. changing interest rate, alteration in the financial health of the issuer) for the market value to deviate from the par/face value so that you can buy it at a low price and sell it at a higher one later. In fact, just the US bond market size alone is larger than the entire global equity market combined together. However, these are highly specialized situations and retail investors tend not to personally trade bonds too often.

 

Bondholders have a preference over shareholders, which is manifested in 2 forms:

  • Regular and uninterrupted interest payment (whereas equity dividend is an option rather than obligation);
  • Liquidation preference over shareholders in the event of default.

 

These 2 features enable bonds to carry a different risk profile versus equity:

  • Equity valuation is a product of expectation on current and future profitability;
  • Bond price is more dependent on the strength of the balance sheet and the current cash flow of the business

Given that balance sheet and cash flow are much easier to measure than future profitability, bonds tend to be less volatile and are perceived to be a lower risk asset class than equity.

 

The special case of property-backed bonds

Until recently, property and bonds were two words only institutional investors had the privilege to be associated with. These were mega-deals that had an entry ticket in the millions of $, which were simply out of reach for most retail investors.

 

Yet due to lowering costs of transaction, securitisation and funding, thanks largely to technological advancement, these entry barriers are beginning to be broken down.

 

It is now possible to:

  • Establish a limited company (special purpose vehicle or SPV) in a respectable jurisdiction within a few hours;
  • Use the SPV to issue shares and bonds to potential investors to fund the purchase of a property;
  • Buy properties, receive rental income and sales proceed using that SPV.

 

This has enabled the securitisation of the property market and thus vastly opened its access to retail investors. A 1M EUR/CHF block of flat may sound like a lot, yet when it is broken down to 10,000 shares valued at 100 EUR/CHF each, suddenly most mortal souls can start building their own property empires.

 

Hence we come to property-backed bonds.

 

An SPV that holds and lets put a property is just like any other businesses, which owns assets to generate revenues, costs for operating and financing of these assets and hopefully, it will make a profit at the end of the day.

 

To acquire these assets (i.e. properties), its shareholders can decide to partly fund it themselves (through equity) and partly issue bonds to borrow money from investors. They then pay out a fraction of the rental income to bondholders as coupon payment and retain the rest as profit. This way, shareholders do not have to commit a huge upfront capital payment for the project, which lowers their financial risk.

 

It’s a pretty sweet deal for bondholders too:

  • They receive a regular and predictable return on their capital without fail -> currently yields around 3.5-5%, which is inflation-busting;
  • Due to the securitisation nature of the product, the minimum investment level can start from as low as 10,000 EUR/CHF -> this significantly lowers the barrier of entry and opens up to many retail investors;
  • It provides an easy and efficient manner for investors to diversify the location and class of their asset base, due to the lower entry barrier;
  • Bonds are secured against the property, which means in the event of default, bondholders have the right to seize the house from shareholders and auction it off. They will be entitled to the proceeds first;
  • The amount of bond as a % of the house value (loan to value ratio) is kept at a sensible level (60%), which means the property can withstand a 40% drop in market value without affecting the capital security if bondholders.

 

The only potential drawback between a bond of this nature versus publicly traded equities or bonds is liquidity. In other words, the ability to turn the investment into cash quickly without value erosion. Given such bonds tend to be privately issued and subscribed, the expectation is that they would be held to maturity. As a result, no markets exist for the trading of such instruments and therefore the liquidity risk is high.

 

In conclusion

The array of investment options available to today’s investors can indeed be confusing. However, when pierced through the haze, it is easy to see that bonds secured against valuable collaterals offer the perfect combination of inflation-adjust return and low risk to the capital.

 

7. January 2019

Le Bijou Investment: Returns Potential and the Underlying Business Model

“There are two ways of being happy: We may either diminish our wants or augment our means.”― Benjamin Franklin

The quote above carries the truth behind the need for making investments. Whenever you have wealth, it’s important to seek ways to grow it. Otherwise it will diminish with time – that’s the burden that comes with wealth.

Real estate investments created more billionaires than any other industry in history. The need for housing is one of the basic human requirements and will never go out of style – just like the need for energy, clothing, transportation and communications. Although, unlike many other industries, real estate is much more stable and mature. It’s hard to think of a disruptive innovation that would bring property out of the playing field. In fact, some people still live in houses built during the 16th and 17th centuries and often consider them a luxury.

 

Le Bijou capitalizes on recent changes in the hospitality industry

It’s common even for mature industries such as real estate to find new ways to evolve and grow. Le Bijou has identified one such way and it’s early enough to build a lucrative business model based upon this niche.

 

Dropped entry threshold and the increased importance of high-quality service

After the invention of the internet, things started to change, especially in the hospitality industry. Online booking platforms such as Booking.com re-shaped the way people think about hotels. The importance of brand awareness dropped dramatically – virtually any boutique hotel could now compete with industry giants as equals, without the need to put billions into advertising. As Amazon Founder Jeff Bezos puts it: “In the old world, you devoted 30% of your time to building a great service and 70% of your time to shouting about it. In the new world, that inverts.”

 

The struggle for privacy

Now consumers have become overwhelmed by constant, brief social interactions with people they don’t know and probably will never meet. Privacy and the freedom to choose whether we want to interact with others or not is now a luxury few can afford. When traveling, there’s nothing pleasant about the check-in process. Most people do not enjoy sharing the elevator with other guests or stumbling upon (rich) strangers in the lobby.

The appearance of AirBNB was another shake to the hospitality industry. Not only did it bring independent homeowners to the market, but it also impacted consumer tastes, as it perfectly matched the increased need for privacy.

We were operating a small apartment through AirBNB in 2013 when we realized that almost half of our customers were high-spending, sophisticated visitors. We found they preferred this type of travel booking because:

  • They liked the privacy and convenience of renting out the whole apartment.
  • They felt in full control of the place.
  • They didn’t have to interact with anyone, including reception and security personnel.
  • They would never have to stumble upon another guest in the lobby.

Overall, the experience was more like staying in a private apartment; more like home and less like a hotel.

 

The underserved luxury customers and Le Bijou’s concept

Even though AirBNB apartments are widely available, luxury consumers are rarely satisfied. AirBNB properties are seldom operated professionally and lack the amenities that a 5-star service would provide – concierge service, great design, professional operations, and a guaranteed level of service. Many travelers expect to rent the whole floor. And most importantly, many guests weren’t excited by the idea of staying in someone’s private apartment that could be accessed by the homeowner at any time. They needed a brand and an institution they could trust. Something that would maintain their desired level of privacy while upholding the emphasis on service they received with traditional bookings.

 

Steve Wozniak, co-Founder of Apple, about his stay at Le Bijou:

 

 

That was the beginning of Le Bijou. As soon as we realized that such a lucrative segment as luxury consumers is underserved, we saw a great business opportunity. We came up with the concept of a modular hotel that would combine the convenience of renting out whole apartments with the prime services and safety of 5-stars hotels. We invested in the first units and since then, we’ve managed dozens of apartments in Europe, working with our own capital, also by banks and private investors.

 

What is Le Bijou?

Le Bijou is a modular, high-end hotel that operates in major Swiss cities with plans to expand to the world’s largest trade and business centers.

Le Bijou’s units are large apartments in prime buildings in the central areas of each city. Every apartment has a unique interior design, top-class amenities, and a great view. Even taking up the whole floor is an option.

All the services that a 5-star hotel would provide are at the visitor’s fingertips: James, our digital butler (backed by artificial intelligence) and the face of our sophisticated concierge service, can handle anything a customer might want, whenever they want it – be it private dining, events booking, transportation or security services.

 

Service Apartments, möblierte Mietwohnung Le Bijou

Inside one of Le Bijou Units


Le Bijou occupancy rate is usually between 75% – 85%. We plan on opening dozens of new units in Switzerland to face increasing demand, and we expect to move next to other major business centers across the globe, including London, Dubai, Hong Kong and New York.

We leverage both institutional and private capital to finance our expansion, and offer two types of investments for retail investors who would like to participate in the growth of our business.

 

How does it work from the financial perspective?

Le Bijou is looking for apartments in the center of Swiss cities in the most desirable locations. We buy or rent them, create luxury interior designs and then rent them out for short-term stays.

Those apartments are financed by a combination of Le Bijou’s own capital, private investors, and banks. Private investors can invest in bonds backed by real estate or in equity form by becoming a co-owner of a profit-generating Le Bijou franchise unit, to potentially receive correspondingly higher returns.

Bond – a type of investment in which the investor receives a guarantee for making a profit; a pledge secures this guarantee.

Equity – what a shareholder owns in a company, entitling him to part of that entity’s profits and a measure of control.

Buying bonds with Le Bijou means that the investor buys shares, giving them the opportunity to earn profit from the rental. The benefit of a bond is its guarantee of income. Those shares are secured by property that is rented, and if (in a case of force majeure) an investor doesn’t receive 3% fixed profit at the end of the indicated period, then the security will be sold and the invested money is returned to the bondholders.

In the model with equity, Le Bijou franchise unit rents real estate for the long-term (up to 20 years), creates luxury interior designs and sets up the marketing channels for these apartments. The ownership of the renovation, lease agreement, and all the financial flows are transferred to a separate, newly created independent company (the Le Bijou Owners Club, an operational company that franchised the Le Bijou system) and the shares in that apartment are sold to a group of investors. These investors then would earn dividends – everything this apartment would earn minus operating expenses. In this embodiment, income is not fixed as in the case with bonds, but its earning potential is significantly higher and may reach 21% per year.

Le Bijou gains profit in the following ways: it retains 10% of property shares (to be able to participate in future discussions regarding the development of projects) and also receives a 20% fee from the revenue. This way, by holding 10% of the shares, we are even more incentivized in the success of the investments we manage: Le Bijou only receives dividends after the capital contribution has been paid.

 

A closer look at the investment model

 

What is the profit dependent on?

To understand what determines profit for investors, we should first understand who our customers are.

They can be divided into three groups:

  1. Tourists, local and international for both business and leisure
  2. Companies and business people who rent apartments for meetings and corporate events
  3. Agencies that rent apartments for private events

 

An obvious conclusion arises here: since tourists are not our only guests, we are less susceptible to seasonality than hotels, which in turn, makes our income more stable.

Often, our apartments are booked by event agencies who need a premium location for creating the right atmosphere. Therefore, our marketing strategy includes promotion among corresponding agencies.

Another advantage of this model is that the investors are not liable for their investments with their own assets, as is often the case when working with crowdfunding services. Most crowdfunding services use bank loans to leverage the purchase and the investors are liable for it with their own assets (i.e. house, cash, etc).

With Le Bijou, with the equity investment, you don’t own the property itself (we only lease it for 20 years), so you are indifferent to its price volatility. Moreover, there’s no bank leverage, so there’s no pledge involved. Therefore your shares and personal assets cannot be taken by a bank in any case.

With the Le Bijou real estate bond, you are still not liable for anything, as a bond is just a guarantee of the company to return your money back with interest.

 

Differences from other hotel investments

Most hotels have a common challenge – seasonality and the corresponding jumps and lags in business. In our case, this problem is solved through the Le Bijou diversified structure of demand (as described above) and by choosing locations in prime areas of major cities, where we can count on business visitors year round. Whereas a typical hotel is bound to renting the whole building, something that is rarely available in central areas, we can also work with small properties such as single apartments or former office buildings.

Managing a traditional hotel means one has to have a bigger overhead and hire full time employees. The need to pay salaries for hundreds of employees decreases the price flexibility, whereas with Le Bijou, we work with a carefully curated selection of independent contractors and carry almost no fixed monthly expenses. Fewer people, fewer worries, fewer risks all add up to a stronger type of investment.

Additionally, Le Bijou’s different investment models each have their own advantages over investments in the hotel industry.

 

Bond investment model advantages

  • Your investments are secured by real estate and you receive a guaranteed income without the dependency on seasonality or managerial overhead.

 

Equity investment model advantages

  • This type of investment is much less capital intensive, as we don’t buy the property – we just lease it. You do not carry the risks of owning the real estate and thus are indifferent to its price fluctuations
  • Your investment is not leveraged by the bank. What that means is that ownership cannot be taken from you under any circumstances, which is always possible if a bank participates in the deal.

 

Differences from traditional real estate investment funds

The main distinctive features of investment funds (access to institutional investors and going through a fund manager) actually are the cause of its biggest weakness: they are spending a lot on expensive management teams and their overhead eats all the profits. Fund managers earn money all the time, while the investors’ profit varies.

Real estate funds usually have an appetite for large properties, so the cost of due-diligence (sometimes as high as a few hundred thousand USD) won’t be too high, relative to the cost of the building. This is a good approach for growing markets, where there are many new developments. But in mature markets, there is much more focus on the financial proposition than the demand for money, so multiple funds bid against each other for investment properties. The property owners increase the price and it draws the profits down. Where there is a lot of competition, there is little profit. The real opportunity lies in a mid-market segment, which is yet unavailable for retail investors but too small for institutional investors.

Not only do these types of funds miss the opportunity to work with smaller properties, but they are also inflexible and thus unable to nimbly work with short-term rentals, which provide the best returns.

Recently, the returns of real estate investment funds have not been great because profit is not guaranteed. Only 9 out of 141 listed funds at Swiss Fund Data yielded more than 3% in the last 12 months at the moment of writing of this article.

Our approach is radically different. We focus on properties in central areas of the biggest cities that a fund or even a hotel won’t consider because of their size, yet they are still not available for retail customers. We lease these properties at a discount, which the landlords are willing to provide because they trust our company. We then rent them out for short-term; it is a much more lucrative business model. We don’t have fixed commissions and our reward is proportional to investors’ earnings, so we don’t eat up the investor profit.

 

Bond investment model review

When investing in bonds, you not only get potentially higher returns than in most funds, but these returns are fixed – the amount of payments is guaranteed. Le Bijou bonds yield 3% – 5.2% fixed annual profit (dependent on the size of the investment).

 

Le Bijou Bonds Model Explained

 

Performance comparison of Le Bijou bonds, Government Bonds, and Bank Deposits. X axis: years, Y axis: worth of 100 CHF initial investment. Le Bijou bond yields 5.2% p.a., government bonds that yield -0.5% p.a. (at the moment of writing, bonds with different maturity yield from -1% to 0.5% p.a; source: Swiss National Bank), and bank deposits that yield 0% (most Swiss banks offer rates from -0.5% to 0.5% p.a.). We assume that all the profits are being reinvested.

 

 

Equity investment model review

You do not risk having ownership of real estate, so you are indifferent to its price volatility; the investor doesn’t care, even if the market is at its peak. There is a massive difference in possible income: instead of 1-3% fixed profit, you may get up to 21% annually.

 

Le Bijou Owners Club

Le Bijou Owners Club Model Explained

 

Swiss Equity Investments PerformancePerformance of the assets with flexible returns, if profits are reinvested each year
X axis: years; Y axis: worth of the initial investment of 100 CHF, CHF

 

 

Switzerland Tourism Arrivals and Revenues

Switzerland’s tourism arrivals and revenues show a positive trend for the last 30 years, almost unaffected by global turbulence and crises. Quarterly revenues – CHF, mln (LHS); Tourist arrivals by quarter, thousand, (RHS). Source: Swiss National Bank, Tradingeconomics

 

Switzerland: Visitor exports and international tourist arrivals expected growth
Source: World Travel & Tourism Council – report on Switzerland

 

What makes Le Bijou exceptional

It’s our experience that makes us indispensable. We have years of practice in accumulating contacts with realtors and owners of the best apartments in Zurich, Zug, Lucerne, Geneva, and other big cities. Apartment owners are pleased to cooperate with us because they know about our brand and know that we care about their property – after all, it’s our money invested in the high-end renovation, so it is in our best interest to keep it in the best shape possible.

We also have established contacts with event agencies in major Swiss cities and travel agencies from Saudi Arabia, Dubai, China, and Qatar, providing a more stable demand for our offerings.

Summarizing this section, the Le Bijou is a unique opportunity for all participants of this business. Owners have a brand to which they can trust their best apartments, agencies have a brand they can cooperate with in creating a proper atmosphere, and guests can just be delighted with the best hotel experience they have ever had.

 

Owners Club

All Le Bijou equity model investors automatically become members of the Owners Club. This is a unique feature that many of our customers appreciate. We created a club in which you can find like-minded people or even future business partners. The Owners Club meets at least a few times a year and is attended by existing investors – investment professionals, business owners, and celebrities, as well as select invited guests.

Investors also become brand ambassadors, and together with our guests create a new community of like-minded people that will accelerate the earnings above and beyond other hotel brands.

 

Last words

Potential investors may want to know about the level of satisfaction experienced by our guests. To that end, we provide testimonials from our consumers which have been published in the press and can be found here.

As an example of the positive feedback we’ve received from our valued customers, we’ve included the following comments below:

“Whether it’s a celebration with one or 100 guests, a business trip or a VIP stay, Le Bijou is an ideal location.” – National Geographic Traveler

“What Le Bijou has accomplished is to put all of the things that otherwise would be very complex for a traveler into a straightforward and elegant experience.” – John Sculley, ex-CEO of Apple and ex-CEO of Pepsi.

 

John Sculley, ex-CEO of Apple and Pepsi, about his stay at Le Bijou:

 

Additional reviews regarding our services can be found in the outlets where we promote our services, including Hotels.com, Airbnb and Trip Advisor.

It’s our hope that the idea of creating exclusive, private hotels inspires you as it has inspired us. We are confident that our investment vehicle is the right product at the right time, providing profit and security in an evolving market.

 

 

27. December 2018

Airbnb turns the tourism industry around

Airbnb celebrated its tenth anniversary in early August. When Airbnb started ten years ago, many found the idea of staying in private lodgings of strangers crazy and predicted that this idea would never work. Today – ten years later – more than 5 million Airbnb hosts offer their accommodation for rent. Hosts around the world have welcomed more than 300 million guests in more than 81,000 cities and from 191 countries.

Read more

19. December 2018

Crowdhouse: Critical Review, Risks, and 5 Alternatives

Overview of the hottest crowdfunding platforms in Switzerland

A professional analysis of top crowdfunding platforms in real estate by Alexander Hübner, real estate investor and property manager, one of Switzerland top 5 entrepreneurs in the service sector (according to Swiss Economic Forum), CEO of Le Bijou, real estate investment management firm.

Assuming that you earned a certain amount of capital (let’s say up to 500K CHF) you must have started exploring possibilities that would help multiply it. Considering some available possibilities of multiplying it through investments you must have realized that:

  • Banks offer a very small percentage of revenue from savings accounts which means you would not benefit much, therefore there is no point of investing there;
  • Investment banks such as Credit Suisse are not interested in managing small capitals;
  • Stock investment requires extensive knowledge in the field; over 95% of funds can’t outperform the market in the long run (surprise!);
  • And the crypto industry is a subject to great risk because its volatile in nature.

So where to invest?

Such a lack of investment options for small-sized investors contributed to the growth of alternative investments market.

The main idea behind alternative investment solutions is “let’s put small amounts of investors’ money together and invest this larger capital in better investment opportunities, unavailable to these investors individually”.

One of the most popular alternative investment models in Switzerland is crowdfunding in real estate. The logic behind this form of investment is that the management company buys a property and then sells shares to its shareholders. To put it simply, small-sized investors put their money together to become owners of a large and lucrative building that none of them can afford to buy individually. In this investment method, you can become an investor with less than 100K. It is interesting that some crowdfunding platforms accept investors who have as little as 1000 CHF, which appeals to a lot of people and the gold rush begins.

One of the most prominent crowd-financing platforms for real estate is Crowdhouse.ch which was named as “The leading Swiss provider in real estate crowd investment” in Cash.ch.

If you already considered investing through Crowdhouse.ch, then most likely you already noticed that there aren’t many reviews, personal experiences and risk overviews available online anywhere else apart from the platform’s website.

Crowdhouse triggered my professional interest, as I’ve been investing in Swiss properties since 2013 on my own as well as with partners. So I decided to dig deeper to see how these crowd-financing companies actually work and produced a quick review that can help others to make better-informed decisions.

Before you get into the analysis of individual proposals in the real estate investment market, I would highly suggest that you learn the business model of each of the companies, so that you can understand their own incentives and the possible risks.

Let’s explore how the crowd-financing model works when applied to real estate by using the example of Crowdhouse platform mentioned above.

So, how does crowd–financing work in real estate?

The properties selected by agencies are self-supporting which means that rental income exceeds mortgage interest and other expenses by a great margin.

Let’s take a more detailed look into the concept of crowdhouse discovering step-by-step procedures of typical Swiss real-estate company.

 

Property selection

Type of buildings: Crowd-financing services look for quality real property that is either completely refurbished or new apartment buildings in locations where they expect increasing demand.

Before offering an investment, they carefully check the location and the building. The main factors in the selection of real estate are demand and overheating of the value of real estate in this location.

Market value estimation: Valuation partner draws up a market value estimate for each property and an additional external report is also compiled by construction experts. The lending bank inspects each property, as they are putting their own money towards it as a way of boosting their security.

If a property passes the inspections and the crowd-financing platform is in agreement with the seller regarding conditions, they secure it for you contractually and give a down payment.

 

Property purchase in co-ownership

  • About half of the purchase price of the property is typically co-financed with a mortgage;
  • The value capital is partitioned among several buyers and offered in co-ownership;
  • When all co-owners have been determined, their value capital is transferred to the common property account. The loaning bank then transfers the purchase amount to the owner of the property. Service take care for the whole transaction process;
  • After the purchase services take care of the management and the property asset management to thereby manage the property profitably, conserve its value and ensure sustainably stable returns.

Recurring rental income

The effective rent yield is usually transferred to the co-owners monthly or per quarter and definitively determined at the end of the year. Income varies depending on the agency, property purchased and market conditions and averages 5-7% per annum (when leveraged through mortgage loan).

Crowdhouse risks

After understanding the crowd-financing processes, let’s proceed and get familiar with its risks.

To fully assess all the risks, I will divide them into 3 parts:

– Risks associated with the purchase of real estate;

– Risks associated with the rental fee;

– Fundamental risks.

Purchase of real estate

Most of the risks associated with this type of investment are similar to the risks of buying property alone.

When you invest in real estate, you have to be ready to losses connected with the following reasons:

  • Change in the attractiveness of the location;
  • Real estate market fluctuation – volatility – short-term changes in the property’s value;
  • The risk of the building (construction quality).

Rental fee-related risks

Your recurring revenues on existing buildings will essentially consist of rental income. They may decrease in the future based on several factors such as:

  • Non-payment of the rent by the tenants;
  • Vacancy rate; Source: Vacancy rates go up in Switzerland, and the rents keep falling; – UBS Real Estate Report
  • Reduction of the rent due to the change in supply and demand;
  • The reduction of the interest rate;
  • Invalidity of the lease agreement (or of specific clauses);
  • Rent reduction requests and other factors including force majeure and natural disasters;

Fundamental risks

  • Your property is immediately pledged and there is a risk of losing it;
  • You are also exposed to the risks associated with the bubble of the Swiss real estate market.

Risks specific to crowd financing services

  • Small shares of properties are illiquid:
    You are not buying a property, but a small piece of property that is much more difficult to sell. Big investment funds are not interested in buying 10%-20% shares of buildings, as the cost of the due diligence will be too high relative to the cost of the share (they would need to evaluate the whole building/location to buy just 10%-20% of the property, what doesn’t make sense financially).
    So most likely you will be urged to sell your shares through your crowd-financing platform, where there may be no buyers for it.
  • Any changes to the project have to be discussed with all owners;
  • Most properties financed by crowdfunding platforms are located in cities’ outskirts or in small towns, that means that the rental income is dependent on local companies’ office’s activity and/or immigration. The smaller the city, the more it is dependent on the few companies that operate there. The trends are that foreign workers leave the country and that companies outsource their local offices to cheaper places.

Let’s try to sum up what we have.


Unlike bonds (with a guaranteed income) and giving your capital to an investment bank, in crowdhouse you buy an actual property, that’s why you are exposed to risks associated with the construction of these buildings, their condition, the location in which they are located, the laws of location and the conditions for leasing this building.

Properties are usually leveraged by the bank by 50%-60% (what doubles all the risks)

Now you understand how it works and what are the risks, let’s get into a comparison of certain services. We will concentrate on their differences to discover how to choose the best options.
There are a few questions you have to answer before choosing one of them:

  • Promised returns;
  • Additional risks;
  • Service fees;
  • What is the minimum to invest in one project?
  • And how many properties they had raised funds for?

 

Crowdhouse.ch and it’s alternatives review

Crowdhouse

 

Estimated returns: 5–7% (actual returns will be around 4% – 5% before income tax, as a part of the revenue goes to security fund and will be locked in there; also, deduct the purchase fees).

Risks: as mentioned above.

They usually buy properties in small towns, where the demand for housing is dependent on a relatively small number of local companies (when compared to a bigger city); or, they buy properties in low-cost locations of bigger cities, where the demand is largely dependent on low-cost tenants, who are usually immigrants and can leave the country. If you lose tenants, the rental price goes down. If it goes down you have nothing to pay for mortgage interest and then you may have to sell a house to cover the bank services.

Fees: 3% of the purchase price of the respective property +  5–7.5% of the property’s success for the property and co-owner management.

Minimum contribution: 100 000 CHF.

Until now, they raised funds for 59 properties, which is the biggest amount in the Swiss market.

 

Crowdhouse Alternatives

Foxstone

Estimated returns: 5,5–7%

Risks: as mentioned above + this particular company appeared on market just a year ago, so there is no information about how many properties they raised funds for.

Fees: 3% of the gross asset value once the transaction is closed and management fees of 0.25% to 0.5% of the asset price (this price is already deducted from returns), digressive according to the amount of the deal.


Minimum contribution: 50 000 CHF.

 

The Housecrowd

Estimated returns: 5–6%

Risks: as mentioned above + this service allows venturing into being an investor starting from 1000 GBP, which is quite a small sum that allows separating ownership between lots of investors.
Nevertheless, this firm has more than 350 properties they raised funds for, which is a large amount and is respectable.

Fees: information on the site tells us that fees are around 5% and can change a bit in different projects.

 

Crowdli

Estimated returns: 5.5-6%

Risks: as mentioned above + all property presented locates in villages with less than 10K population. In this case, you expose yourself to the undue risk of loss of liquidity of your property. And as a common flaw of this type of investment you own this property, and if it loses liquidity – you will have to lower rental rate or even sell it to cover the mortgage.

Fees: 3,6%(without VAT)  of the gross asset value once the transaction is closed and you pay from 4% to 5% of years income for administration service (+ you cover the cost of promotion of your property).

You can become an investor by investing 10 000 CHF.

 

Crowdpark

Estimated returns: 5-7%

Risks: as mentioned above + this company has only 1 open proposition for co-ownership and doesn’t show finished crowdfunding processes. This moment pushes us to realize that they might not be as experienced as we would like them to see. Also, the site of a company lacks any information about their fees and historical returns.

The minimum amount of investment for this option starts from 25 000 CHF.

 

MyBrick

Estimated returns: 4.5-7.5%

Risks: as mentioned above + this company takes the biggest amount of loans from the banks (70+%) to cover the price of the property. Which means that in case of lowering the rental cost and losing tenants, owners will have to pay back the whole sum to a bank for its interest rate. The information on historical returns is not available at the time of writing of this material.

Fees: charges any investor 2-3% (Before VAT) of the amount invested to cover the expenses related to the preparation of the acquisition.

You can become an investor starting with 20 000 CHF investment.

 

Let’s step aside to have a look at what this market has to propose for us

 

Real estate market is overheated in major locations.

UBS Wealth research suggests that the Swiss real estate market is overheated in several major locations.

You can make a simple analogy with the stock market of the late 90s: you would hardly recommend someone to invest in IT companies that were at their peak in those years.

“Heat level” in different geographical regions of Swiss real estate market – source (UBS Wealth)

 

Liquidity problem: How do you exit if there’s a need?

Along with the market conditions and promises of services that will help you to get in, there should always be a matter of promptly exiting the market.

In case you need to return your investments promptly, or when the market starts to collapse, you will face the following problem: since the trade is conducted only on platforms similar to discussed above, you will have to sell your property mostly there. The amount of buyers on such platforms is quite limited, so most probably you won’t be able to sell your piece of the pie really quick.

Investment funds won’t be interested in buying 5%-10% share in a building, as the cost of due diligence will be too high relative to the amount of the investment – they can spend on due diligence half of the worth of your share. So financially it doesn’t make any sense to investment funds, as well as to any other institutional investors.

 

Risk/Profit ratio

Risks and profits are one of the most important factors that should be considered before making an investment of any type.

In the best case, we will receive about 6% per annum; the income is not guaranteed, and we have our money locked in real estate for 5-10 years without the real opportunity to pull them out. The model is capital intense and also you take a mortgage, that doubles your risks.

Personally, I came to the conclusion that investment in Crowdhouse and similar services don’t provide a fair reward for the risk. During my career, I have been setting up deals that would yield 7% fixed returns (bonds), and also other deals without even buying the real estate but rather leasing it, that would give me up to 21%, and 13% – 18% in average.

Taking into account all the risks described above, I thoroughly advise you to rethink the topic of the purchase of real estate as an investment.

 

12. December 2018

Investing under 100K in Switzerland: Returns & Risks Overview

Overview of top investment options: Where to invest money in Switzerland and how to get the best return on 50K – 100K CHF for foreign and domestic capital. A professional take on the current status quo of foreign investment opportunities in Switzerland, plus an analysis of the pros and cons of the most popular investment methods by one of Switzerland’s top 5 entrepreneurs in the service sector (according to Swiss Economic Forum), Mr. Alexander Hubner, CEO of Le Bijou.

 

It’s not easy to be an investor. If you have earned a somewhat significant amount of money, you immediately join the elite club of people struggling with an elite disease: where can you put your wealth to grow it?

Keeping cash is probably the worst thing you can do with your wealth, second only to spending it all for nothing. The chances are, though, that not long after you’ve worn an investor’s hat, you realized that there aren’t many attractive investment options available.

The super-rich learned how to turn millions into billions and don’t need your relatively small funds. The poor can’t help either. The most fruitful deals are not yet available to you, as the entry ticket is too high, and the available options are rather disappointing. That is exactly why rich families and their offices are constantly seeking out and fighting over the best deals all over the world; some bankers travel 300 days a year looking for great investment projects.

To assist mid-sized and retail investors on their difficult path, I have put together a brief overview of investment options in Switzerland. I spent the last 11 years investing in Swiss assets and I hope this advice will help you put your money to work with more efficiency.

 

Quick summary (jump to section):

1. Swiss bonds
Returns: -0.8% to 0.7% (2018) for different bond types; real estate bonds yield up to 3%.
Risks: Bonds are widely considered the safest investment option.

2. Swiss stocks
Returns: Vary widely; Swiss index funds (close to “average” market returns) show between 0.37% and 1.32% annual returns.
Risks: Picking individual stocks is highly not recommended for non-professional traders.

3. Hedge funds
Returns: Vary widely, not predictable.
Risks: Highly not recommended, as the performance of most funds is worse than the average market performance over the long run.

4. Direct real estate investments in Switzerland
Returns: 2% to 4% p.a. for mid-market; 10% and higher for luxury properties
Risks: The demand can be dependent on nearby factories and offices of big companies

5. Real estate crowd-financing
Returns: 6% to 17% p.a.; best luxury properties can yield up to 20% when structured right.
Risks: The demand can be dependent on nearby factories and offices of big companies.

6. Bank deposits in Switzerland
Returns: -0.5% to 0.5% p.a.
Risks: The bank provides no collateral for investors.

7. Robo advisors
Returns: Vary widely, not predictable.
Risks: Specific to the platform and approach.

8. Wealth Management: top family & multifamily offices in Switzerland
Returns: N/A, as usually wealth management companies create custom portfolios for investors that consist of other instruments, covered or not covered in this article.
Risks: Bad management and/or wrong incentives of the manager.

9. Investing in Gold in Switzerland
Returns: N/A, as the only returns that can be made come from the changes in gold’s price, which is unpredictable.
Risks: The price is unpredictable.

 

Luxusimmobilien investieren Schweiz

 

Best major types of investment options in Switzerland

There currently exists quite an array of options as far as investments are concerned. The key to a successful portfolio lies in the careful and thoughtful decision making process that best fits your investment goals, keeping in mind capital, timeframe and potential risks. Below, you’ll find a breakdown of the major types of investments. Hopefully, it will be a useful tool as you create your investment strategy.

 

Switzerland Real Estate Investiments

 

1. Investing in bonds

Returns: Vary from -0.8% to 0.7% for different bond types; real estate bonds yield up to 3%.
Risks: Bonds are widely considered as the safest investment option.

A bond is a fixed-income security, whereby an entity borrows funds from an investor for a specific time period and promises to return capital at maturity with a fixed or variable interest rate.

Characteristics of a Bond

  • Bonds are usually traded by a corporate entity or a government for a project or a specific purpose.
  • Bonds may be traded on exchanges or over-the-counter.
  • The parties partaking in the bond investment cycle are referred to as the “Issuer” on one end, and the “Bondholder” or “Creditor” on the other.
  • The main body of the bond is referred to as “Bond principal”, which is returned upon maturity date at a contractually specified “interest rate” (AKA “coupon rate” and “payment”).
  • Bonds are issued at face value (e.g., $100 or 1000 CHF) that is termed “par” and the payment is calculated as per fixed interest based on par.
  • Coupon Dates are the fixed dates in time whereby payment of interest is made to the Investor by the Issuer until maturity date is reached, up to 30 years. Coupon dates are usually fixed at annual or semi-annual periods.
  • The Creditor has no ownership rights arising from the owning of bonds, unlike in the case of stock investments.

Advantages of bond investments

  • Low risk – bonds are one of the safest and statistically low-risk investment methods.
  • Bondholders’ rights are preferred over stockholders’ rights – those who own bonds get paid first.
  • Readily available information for due diligence on most of the municipality and government bonds in the form of economic forecasts and ratings.

Disadvantages of Bond Investment

  • Low returns that accompany the high security of bond investment.
  • Brokerage and custody fees can eat out your profit, so they need to be accounted for at an early stage of decision making to provide a feasible comparison between the brokers.

Swiss bond investment

Many of the major banks will offer bond investments as part of their services portfolio. This is the time to compare the fees based on your initial investment criteria. The broker comparison tool by Moneyland.ch is invaluable for this purpose.

All major banks will trade in bonds. Here are some of the most innovative and reliable institutions for your consideration:

Swiss real estate bonds

Some companies offer real estate bonds that pay up to 3% p.a. while keeping your risk at a minimum, as your cash flow is backed by a piece of real estate.

Extra resources for Bond Investments:

Looking to invest in bonds online? Choose your online broker with Investopedia

Invest in Swiss Bonds: Interest Rates

Investing in Swiss Government Bonds: Interest Rates

 

 

2. Investing in stocks

Returns: Vary widely; Swiss index funds (close to “average” market returns) show between 0.37% and 1.32% annual returns.
Risks: Picking individual stocks is highly not recommended for non-professional traders.

Stocks are a form of investment, whereby an investor gets to own a proportionate share of a company, i.e. its assets and earnings, when buying its shares (AKA stock or equity).

Characteristics of a Stock

  • An investor in corporate stocks is referred to as a “shareholder”.
  • Common stock allows its owner to have voting rights and dividends on the company’s earnings, as well as provides ownership rights to a share of the company.
  • Preferred stock suggests that a stakeholder will not vote but will have higher dividends as well as ownership rights to a portion of a company.
  • Stockbrokers are usually the licensed professionals who are eligible to buy and sell stocks on stock exchange markets.
  • Stocks may be sold OTC (Over-The-Counter) as well as openly on the stock exchange with the latter being easily subjectable to due diligence and the former almost impossible to gauge from this perspective, as private companies have no obligation to disclose their financial information.

Just as with bonds, there is a primary and secondary market for stocks, primary being the shares issued to the stock exchange in the process of the IPO, when a privately-held company becomes a public one.

How to successfully trade stocks?

There’s no easy answer.

One thing you might want to consider is that most of the professional fund managers can’t beat the market (just one item of research: 95% of equity funds in the US performed worse than a distributed investment in the market, i.e. “index”). If professionals can’t beat the market by picking stocks, what evidence makes you think that you can beat it?

If you are a middle-level investor and you don’t have reasons to believe that you are the next investment genius like Ray Dalio or Warren Buffet, I’d encourage you to not to pick individual stocks but rather invest in market indices (index funds), the pro’s and con’s of which are described below.

Pros of passive stock investment in index funds

  • If you invest in index funds (not in individual stocks!), you will almost always do better than you would if holding cash. If you consider the stock market in the US, there were only 4 short periods, huge crises, where you would have made more money in the long run if you had stayed in cash.

Cons of passive stock investment in index funds

  • As the economy moves in cycles, after a bull market always comes a bear market, so even your investments in index funds (i.e. investments in the market overall) can temporarily lose their value.
  • Potential of no returns or even losing it all if a company goes bankrupt (think Dell losing market value when not keeping up with smartphone era).

 

Investing in Swiss stocks

If using one of Switzerland’s EFTs to multiply your capital (investing into ADRs or opting for the most complex way of using one of the 2 stock exchanges direct), Swiss stock is still one of the most trusted options on the investment horizon. Switzerland welcomes domestic and foreign capital alike with foreign direct investment stock in the country amounting to 1 059 777 million USD in 2017.

Useful resources on Stock Investment in Switzerland:

swiss hedge funds

Equity Funds Outperformed by Benchmarks, source: AEI
(no data on Switzerland, but no reason to think the result is going to be different)

 

Invest in Swiss Stock

Switzerland Stock Market Index – probably, the only safe option to invest in Swiss stocks in the long run.
1-year return at the date of writing this article: 1.42% (
Bloomberg)

 

 

3. Hedge fund investments in Switzerland

Returns: Vary widely, not predictable.
Risks: Highly not recommended, as most funds perform worse than the average market performance in the long run.

As the purpose of this article is mostly to familiarize our readers with how to invest amounts of money below 100K, the hedge funds subtopic is way beyond the point, as it requires larger amounts and has a high threshold to enter in every meaning. For those totally uninitiated, a classic real-life example of hedge funds would be Soros Fund Management by George Soros, and the fictional favorite would be “Axe Capital” in the “Billions” series by Showtime.

Again, statistics suggest that most hedge funds can’t beat the market in the long run. There are a few exceptionally good hedge funds who consistently performed better than the market, like Ray Dalio’s Bridgewater Associates and George Soros’ Fund Management, which stayed profitable during the crisis. 100K is definitely below the radar of these funds, and some of them (like Bridgewater Associates) are closed for new investors and even let go some of their old investors.

Before investing into a hedge fund (what we wouldn’t recommend), consider the following: in 2008, Warren Buffet issued a challenge, betting $1M that a basket of hedge funds wouldn’t beat S&P 500 in over 10-years. In 2018, he won the bet.

 

Swiss Hedge Funds

Buffett’s bet against hedge funds: link

 

 

4. Direct real estate investments: investing in Swiss property

Returns: From 2% to 4% p.a. for mid-market; 10% and higher for luxury properties.
Risks: The demand can be dependent on nearby factories and offices of big companies.

Real estate investments are considered a cornerstone of building wealth, but when it comes to the Swiss real estate market, the most lucrative deals are closed to investors who can’t put at least a million dollars on the table.

The cost to buy a property or an apartment downtown in a city like Zurich starts from 600K CHF up. From my 20 years experience investing in real estate, I can tell you that the best returns are made on properties in premium locations, where the prices start from 2M – 4M CHF.

You can make double-digit returns if the deal was properly structured and you are skillful enough to manage the property well. There are other models to increase the profit even more, like long-term leasing: owners are often willing to give up to 30% discount if the property is being rented for 20 years, as they can transfer vacancy risk onto the lessee.

Unfortunately, putting a few million into a property is not an option for many. Rates in rural areas and city outskirts are more accessible for beginning investors, but the rental rates are also too low to make this option attractive, considering its risks. Let’s consider this option in detail.

If you have at least 100K to invest into real estate, then you can leverage the money by a 1:4 ratio, so you can buy a 400K property. But even in this case, you will have to buy a property far outside the city center or in a rural area.

In such places, the rental demand for your property will rely greatly on the activity of nearby companies and factories, whose workers can rent your apartment, or immigrants, who oftentimes look for the cheapest rental options.

You don’t bear these risks if you invest in high-end luxury properties in the city center, where there’s always some kind of demand – either through long-term or even short-term rentals. That’s because every solid company looks to provide housing in the most prestigious locations, and you don’t rely on a particular market segment or a specific company.

Let’s look at the economic trends that impact leveraged properties in more detail. Central Bank’s interest rates were less than 0.5% since 2010, and they are negative at the moment. That means that leveraged investments into real estate were attractive for a long time, and many investors already ran this model.

The Central Bank controls the economy by cyclically adjusting the rates, so when the rate goes up, many investors won’t be able to pay the interest and will be forced to sell the property. That means that the prices will fall, as the market will face a liquidity problem – too many people will be selling their properties.

As the valuation of your property falls (which equals the value of your collateral), the bank can demand to review the interest rate accordingly, and if you fail to pay the interest, you will be forced to sell. Consider that in the best case and best time, you will be making 2% – 4% returns p.a., given that you have a 100% occupancy and the interest rate for your loan is below 1%.

Pluses of real estate investment:

  • Properties in central areas have a stable, diversified demand.
  • You can leverage your money to buy a more expensive property.

Minuses of real estate investment:

  • Increased risks when doing a leveraged purchase.
  • The market in many regions of Switzerland is considered “heated”.
  • Most profitable properties in central areas are not available to an investor that is looking to invest 100K or less.
  • Property condition is deteriorating with time, so its value decreases.
  • Managing the rent, finding the tenants, and signing contracts is a job in its own right that consumes time and money (escrow, attorney, agent fees, etc.).

Useful resources on Real Estate investment in Switzerland:

 

Luxury Real Estate Investments in Switzerland

Some luxury properties, when taken on a long-term lease and rented out on a daily basis (short-term rentals), can make up to 20% returns p.a. on the invested capital

 

 

5. Real estate crowd-financing

Returns: 6% to double digits, depending on the model.
Risks: The demand can be dependent on nearby factories and offices of big companies.

This is one of the very few options for tapping into the game of the Ultra Rich with only a few hundred thousand in the pocket. Real estate crowd-financing helps smaller investors to put their money together and buy a property that no one of them can afford individually.

Among Swiss real estate crowd-financing platforms, Crowdhouse.ch and Foxstone.ch are the most notable; they make investing 100k in real estate with good returns more realistic. The definite leader is the first one on the list and it is highly recommended that you check out Crowdhouse.ch reviews to see for yourself if this is a good choice for your specific investment needs.

The biggest drawback to using Crowdhouse is that they do not invest in luxury housing, instead preferring smaller cities and suburbs. This means that your demand can decrease if the economic situation in the region changes.

For example, if the property is located in a smaller town and the biggest factory fires a significant number of its employees, the tenants can have no funds to pay rent. Office relocations are also happening quite often, causing tenants to leave rentals. Similarly, immigration levels are decreasing, which puts landlords who own budget housing in danger. One month of unpaid rent will likely eat out all the profit.

In contrast, when applied to the luxury property market, the crowd-financing model can drive double-digit returns.

Major pluses of crowd-financing in Swiss real estate:

  • Low entrance threshold with some property prices allowing as little as 20K minimum to partake in a crowd-financing of the real estate deal.
  • Little involvement after sealing the deal, so your passive income remains passive. For a commission, crowd-financing platforms deal with the day-to-day management of the property.

Main minuses of the Crowd-Financing:

  • Rural areas and city outskirts are less attractive as an object of investment, as they rely on fewer sources of demand.
  • Some platforms that use leverage (including Crowdhouse.ch) make owners personally liable for the mortgage; this means that if the price of the building drops to the point where the bank will lose its money, the owners will be urged to put up their personal assets to refinance the building.

Useful resources on Crowd-Financing in Switzerland:


Crowdfinancing expected returns

Crowdhouse’s expected returns and typical investments

 

 

6. Investing money in Swiss banks

Returns: -0.5% to 0.5% p.a.
Risks: There is no collateral that the bank can provide to investors.

Indeed, the Swiss bank system is considered one of the safest and most secure – both in terms of keeping your capital intact as well as keeping your funds away from prying eyes. But if you are looking to multiply or even slightly grow your money – you might be better off looking at another option, as interest rates are far from leading positions in the world, or Europe for that matter.

Be it a savings account, a deposit, or an online trading account – the money is safe indeed, but it sticks to a strict diet, so to say, interest-wise. In recent years, some deposits have even been subject to negative interest rates.

Useful resources on Bank Investments in Switzerland:

 

Swiss Banks Returns Interest Rates
Returns of Swiss banks savings accounts, 
source (calculated on CHF 100 investment on 10 years term)

 

 

7. Robo advisors

As per Statista, assets under management in the newly-emerged Robo-Advisors niche amounted to $323M in 2018 and will reach $1287M by the year 2022. In fact, Switzerland is perceived to be the most challenging financial market to enter for Robo-advisors due to the unprecedented level of privacy that financial data enjoys in the country.

To illustrate the scale of things, it suffices to say that Canada has 10 times as much capital managed by Robo-advisors than Switzerland; UK 27 times as much with 8 891 million, and US market is a staggering 906 times bigger than the Swiss in the year 2018.

What is a financial robo-advisor?

Robo-advisors are essentially online platforms proving wealth management tools and advice based on technological innovation and mathematical algorithms. Such platforms work with minimal intrusion from humans but are more and more widely incorporated into the routine processes of traditional wealth management institutions.

Best Swiss Robo advisory companies

The Swiss market also had some players emerging on the robo-advisory horizon with the biggest fintech startups in the niche being: InvestGlass, TrueWealth, VZ, and Finanzportal. The global scene is dominated by platforms like Wealthfront and Betterment.

Pros of robo advisory financial platforms:

  • Unlimited learning capacity. No human brain can possibly compete with the unlimited calculative power of machines, which are backed up with expandable memory on Amazon servers. It is just a matter of time and human input as to how quickly AI will learn the right algorithms.
  • Comparatively effortless scaling of services to a vast spread of clients, resulting in lower risks.

Cons of robo advisors:

  • Taking the “gut” feeling entirely out of wealth management is a bit scary at first – as the industry has been basing its decisions off the field knowledge, financial expertise, and intuition of veterans for centuries. As an example, what algorithm could you possibly create to appreciate the impact of one Tweet by Elon Musk on Tesla’s stock? But machines are still learning under the supervision of humans, so the risks are somewhat mitigated.
  • Automation may lead to machine errors, specifically probable in the learning curve.

Useful resources on Robo Advisors in Switzerland:

 

 

8. Wealth Management: Top family and multifamily offices in Switzerland

Returns: N/A, as usually wealth management companies create custom portfolios for investors that consist of other instruments, covered or not covered in this article.
Risks: bad management and/or wrong incentives of the manager

What is wealth management?

Wealth management is a complex set of financial, accounting, insurance, real estate, advisory and tax services provided both by banks and individual companies / wealth managers to rich families.

Characteristics of Wealth Management

  • If a specific office only preoccupies itself with the wealth management of one family, such office is called a family office.
  • If the company extends its wealth management services to a number of wealthy families, such a firm is referred to as multifamily office.
  • The range of services provided is extensive and will cover everything from purchasing real estate on behalf of a client, optimizing taxes, managing the accounting, and buying bonds and stocks, even up to providing concierge services.
  • Fees will be charged to a client’s account depending on the services provided and may include bank fees, consultation fees, admin fees, investment product fees, and even performance-based fees sometimes as high as 20% of the profit made through the year.

Pros for wealth management:

  • Wealth management companies usually benefit from having access to private deals that are not publically available.
  • Bespoke services with the level of customization that can’t be compared to what you get in a bank or a fund.

Cons of wealth management:

  • Entrance threshold is rather steep for wealth management companies; most of them will not deal with anything below 1M CHF.

 

For example, Zuckerberg finanz is one of the rare firms that would accept a 100K client. Zurich-based Linvo AG will only start at 500K CHF, meanwhile, even that can be a pretty small amount for Crossbridge Capital, a Monaco-based company with $3B in assets under management.

Useful resources on Wealth Management in Switzerland:

 

Family Office Switzerland

Example of a family office structure, source

 

 

9. Investing in Gold in Switzerland

Returns: N/A, as the only returns that can be made come from changes in gold’s price, which is unpredictable.
Risks: The price is unpredictable.

Gold has been considered a good way to preserve wealth for centuries due to its physical qualities complemented by shiny looks. The Swiss economy is rather welcoming to gold investment and has created favorable conditions for it, defining gold bullion as a currency equivalent exempt from VAT and custom duties.

Thriving infrastructure around gold investment in Switzerland:

The biggest concern regarding gold investments is the price variation. The price of gold is driven by fear and is subject to volatility. If you do not have the time to understand and watch the underlying trends that drive the price of gold, the advice would be to not to put a large portion of your wealth into it.

If you consider investments in precious metals as an indisputably safe option to preserve and multiply your wealth, you might want to read the story of H.L. Hunt, once the world’s wealthiest man, who lost everything down to the last dime after speculative investments in silver in the 1970’s.

 

Useful resources on Gold investment in Switzerland:

 

Gold Prices Chart Switzerland

Gold price chart. Do you think it’s overpriced or underpriced? Are you sure? – source

 

Afterword. Armed for decision making

Hopefully, this short and rather pessimistic overview gave you a better understanding of what can you expect from investing in Swiss assets. Among the most promising options are real estate investments, wealth management companies that can source private deals, index funds, and bonds (including real estate bonds as a low-risk investment with a relatively high yield).

As soon as you understand the available options, and their upsides and downsides, it’s time to define what kind of returns you are going after, what kind risks you can tolerate, and then make your move forward to multiply your wealth.

 

 

5. December 2018

Deluxe hotels in Zurich

By the lake, in the middle of the city or above the rooftops of Zurich: the city’s finest deluxe hotels pamper their guests with 5-star luxury and unique service.
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28. November 2018

Real estate as an investment alternative to shares & Co.

Bonds, overnight money or even savings books are hardly profitable anymore, share prices have been on a roller coaster for years and gold is at a new high. On the other hand, money is cheaper than ever. No wonder that more and more wealthy Swiss and institutional investors are interested in real estate as a safe investment.
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5. November 2018

Le Bijou on the cover of Swiss Enterpreneurs Magazine

Le Bijou is revolutionizing travel by transforming prime-location residential apartments into the hotel experience of the future.

Madeleine Fallegger, Co-Founder of Le Bijou in an interview with the Swiss Entrepreneurs Magazine.

In real estate, “Bijou” is used to describe a race and precious property. In turn, Le Bijou selects the very best apartments and furnishes them in accordance to Swiss contemporary design, providing the service and look of a premium hotel.
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31. October 2018

These smart home solutions deliver high returns

Smart Home solutions sustainably increase the attractiveness of real estate, ensure capital security and high returns. They have to be the right ones, however. A study by the oldest Swiss think tank, the Swiss Gottlieb Duttweiler Institute, reveals what these are.
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